Meteorology
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Meteorology

READ ME FIRST!!!!!

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4/18/2006 TUESDAY (Wednesday's instructions are below today's instructions)

Open the
Project Datastreme
web page into a second page by placing the cursor over the link, right button click, then "open in new window".

Read the "Daily Summary" and "Supplemental information" for both Monday and Tuesday.
In the daily summary for Tuesday, answer the questions listed there under the "concept of the day".

Under "DataStreme Atmosphere Investigations", click on "Monday - Investigation A". Follow the instructions there - remember, when you print images, print them in LANDSCAPE.

Staple them together and turn them in when you complete all the exercises on FRIDAY.

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4/5/2006 WEDNESDAY

Open the
Project Datastreme
web page into a second page by placing the cursor over the link, right button click, then "open in new window".

1) Read the daily summary for Tuesday and answer the questions listed there under the "concept of the day".

2) Read the daily summary for Wednesday.

3) Read the Supplemental Information for Tuesday AND Wednesday.

4) Click on "Wednesday - Investigation B" and follow the instructions there. Remember, images need to be printed in LANDSCAPE.

5) Finish all the activities and work on completing this week's exercise. You will be turning in all your work for this week Friday. Have all the images sorted with the proper investigation, and staple them all together before handing them in Friday at the end of class.

5) Read chapter 11 in your textbook.





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Hope you enjoyed your snow day!

3/22/2006

For the record, it is (STILL) IMPORTANT to read the Supplemental information.

Open the
Project Datastreme
web page into a second page by placing the cursor over the link, right button click, then "open in new window".

1) Read the daily summary for Tuesday and answer the questions listed there under the "concept of the day".

2) Read the daily summary for Wednesday.

3) Read the Supplemental Information for Tuesday AND Wednesday.

4) Click on "Wednesday - Investigation B" and follow the instructions there. Remember, images need to be printed in LANDSCAPE.

5) Finish all the activities and work on completing this week's exercise. You will be turning in all your work for this week Friday. Have all the images sorted with the proper investigation, and staple them all together before handing them in Friday at the end of class.

5) Read chapter 10 in your textbook.



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3/20/2006


Open the
Project Datastreme
web page into a second page by placing the cursor over the link, right button click, then "open in new window".

Read the "Daily Summary" and "Supplemental information".

Under "DataStreme Atmosphere Investigations", click on "Monday - Investigation A". Follow the instructions there - remember, when you print images, print them in LANDSCAPE.

Staple them together and turn them in when you complete all the exercises on FRIDAY.


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3/15/2006 - The Ides of March!

For the record, it is IMPORTANT to read the Supplemental information.

Open the
Project Datastreme
web page into a second page by placing the cursor over the link, right button click, then "open in new window".

1) Read the daily summary for Tuesday and answer the questions listed there under the "concept of the day".

2) Read the daily summary for Wednesday.

3) Read the Supplemental Information for Tuesday AND Wednesday.

4) Click on "Wednesday - Investigation B" and follow the instructions there. Remember, images need to be printed in LANDSCAPE.

5) Finish all the activities and work on completing this week's exercise. You will be turning in all your work for this week Friday. Have all the images sorted with the proper investigation, and staple them all together before handing them in Friday at the end of class.

5) Read chapter 10 in your textbook.




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3/13/2006

Back to Datastreme!

Open the
Project Datastreme
web page into a second page by placing the cursor over the link, right button click, then "open in new window".

Read the "Daily Summary" and "Supplemental information".

****What does the term "aequinoctium" mean?

Under "DataStreme Atmosphere Investigations", click on "Monday - Investigation A". Follow the instructions there - remember, when you print images, print them in LANDSCAPE.

Staple them together and turn them in when you complete all the exercises on FRIDAY.


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3/8/2006
Go to the following web page and follow the instructions there.


links...



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3/6/2006

No Datastreme today.

If you ask about why the Datastreme page isn't new or is the same as last week, you get 50% off your lab grade for today for not following instructions.

Always follow the instructions I leave here, do not just start on Datastreme.

Answer the questions below using the links provided either here or on links provided by the NOAA/Indianapolis branch.

Open the
Severe Weather Preparedness Week
web page into a second page by placing the cursor over the link, right button click, then "open in new window".

1) What was March 5 - 11, 2006 proclaimed by the governor in Indiana?

2) When and where is the Weather Spotter talk in Bedford scheduled?

3) Find the link for "Astronomical Data". When will Vernal Equinox occur in 2006?

4) Find the link for "Hoosier Weather". What information can be found there?

5) Find the link for "weather Events". Read it - I'll get copies for you.

6) What is the weather radio station for this area? (NOT Bloomington)

7) On the following link
Radio warnings
what is meant by the term "extended forecast"?

8) Find the "River info" link, then find Williams. What information can be found by clicking on the Williams link?

9) Click on the link for "Graphical" listed under forecast. Slowly move the mouse over each condition time. What happens?

10) What is dewpoint in Indianapolis, according to the information given when you place the cursor over it?

11) What is the general wind direction at 4 P.M.?

12) Find the link for Climate, then click on forecast. Under Monthly (30 day) Outlooks, find and click on Monthly & Seasonal Outlook Maps. Click on the map for Mar-Apr-May 2006. What is the forecast for this area?

13) What does EC mean for the map in #12?

14) Go to the following link:

El Nino


What is "El Nino"?

15) Compare the conditions of El Nino with those of La Nina.




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3/1/2006
2/27/2006

Open the
Project Datastreme
web page into a second page by placing the cursor over the link, right button click, then "open in new window".

Read the "Daily Summary" and "Supplemental information".

Under "DataStreme Atmosphere Investigations", click on "Monday - Investigation A". Follow the instructions there - remember, when you print images, print them in LANDSCAPE.

Staple them together and turn them in when you complete all the exercises on FRIDAY.

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2/22/2006

Open the
Project Datastreme
web page into a second page by placing the cursor over the link, right button click, then "open in new window".

1) Read the daily summary for Tuesday and answer the questions listed there under the "concept of the day".

2) Read the daily summary for Wednesday.

3) Read the Supplemental Information for Tuesday AND Wednesday.

4) Click on "Wednesday - Investigation B" and follow the instructions there. Remember, images need to be printed in LANDSCAPE.

5) Finish all the activities and work on completing this week's exercise. You will be turning in all your work for this week Friday. Have all the images sorted with the proper investigation, and staple them all together before handing them in Friday at the end of class.

5) Read chapter 8 in your textbook.



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2/20/2006

Open the
Project Datastreme
web page into a second page by placing the cursor over the link, right button click, then "open in new window".

Read the "Daily Summary" and "Supplemental information".

Under "DataStreme Atmosphere Investigations", click on "Monday - Investigation A". Follow the instructions there - remember, when you print images, print them in LANDSCAPE.

Staple them together and turn them in when you complete all the exercises on FRIDAY.







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2/15/2006

Open the
Project Datastreme
web page into a second page by placing the cursor over the link, right button click, then "open in new window".

1) Read the daily summary for Tuesday and answer the questions listed there under the "concept of the day".

2) Read the daily summary for Wednesday.

3) Click on "Wednesday - Investigation B" and follow the instructions there. Remember, images need to be printed in LANDSCAPE.

4) Finish all the activities and work on completing this week's exercise. You will be turning in all your work for the week Monday. Have all the images sorted with the proper investigation, and staple them all together before handing them in Monday.

5) Read chapter 6 in your textbook.



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2/13/2006

Open the
Project Datastreme
web page into a second page by placing the cursor over the link, right button click, then "open in new window".

Read the "Daily Summary" and "Supplemental information".

Under "DataStreme Atmosphere Investigations", click on "Monday - Investigation A". Follow the instructions there - remember, when you print images, print them in LANDSCAPE.

Staple them together and turn them in when you complete the exercise.




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2/8/2006

Open the
Project Datastreme
web page into a second page by placing the cursor over the link, right button click, then "open in new window".

1) Read the daily summary for Tuesday and answer the questions listed there under the "concept of the day".

2) Read the daily summary for Wednesday.

3) Click on "Wednesday - Investigation B" and follow the instructions there. Remember, images need to be printed in LANDSCAPE.

4) Finish all the activities and work on completing this week's exercise. You will be turning in all your work for the week Friday. Have all the images sorted with the proper investigation, and staple them all together before handing them in Friday.

5) Read chapter 6 in your textbook.

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2/6/2006

Open the
Project Datastreme
web page into a second page by placing the cursor over the link, right button click, then "open in new window".

Read the "Daily Summary" and "Supplemental information".

Under "DataStreme Atmosphere Investigations", click on "Monday - Investigation A". Follow the instructions there - remember, when you print images, print them in LANDSCAPE.

Staple them together and turn them in when you complete the exercise.


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2/1/2006
Open the
Project Datastreme
web page into a second page by placing the cursor over the link, right button click, then "open in new window".

1) Click on "Daily Summary" for Tuesday, read the "Concept for the day", and answer the questions found there on a separate paper.

2) Read the "Supplemental Information" for both Tuesday and Wednesday.

3) Go to "Surface" and click on "Isobars, Fronts, Radar, & Data". Print out (IN LANDSCAPE) the map.

4) What is tha date and time of the map?

5) What is the time of the plotting of the fronts?

6) On the map, draw a circle around the areas that are completely overcast.

7) Go to "Current NWS Weather Watches and Warnings". What is the current warning for Tennesee?


Go to the following web site:

Weather map symbols


8) Draw the symbol for moderate or heavy showers of rain and snow mixed.

Go to the following web site
WW2010 U. Illinois
and find surface observations for the Midwest. Click on it, Click on "print", then change the default print settings to "Black and White Friendly" on the page that comes up after you click on print, then click on "Start Download". After the image appears, click on the button at the top right side of the page and rotate the image clockwise. Click the printer image to print the image.

Turn in all of this assignment with your name on every sheet.

WW2010 U. Illinois



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1/30/2006
Ok, my instructions on this page take precedence over the instructions on the Datastreme web page. In other words, no matter what the Datastreme web site says to do, do what I say to do....

1) Open the
Project Datastreme
web page into a second page by placing the cursor over the link, right button click, then "open in new window".

2) Under "DataStreme Atmosphere Investigations" Click on "Monday - Investigation A". Read through the instructions, but the only printout you will need to do is "Monday Image 1 File". Print it out IN LANDSCAPE.

You will actually need the Supplemental Information file for Monday - read through it before answering the questions - but I'll get it copied and hand it out later. DO NOT PRINT IT OUT!

3) Answer the questions about "chapter 2" below using both the Ch. 2 reading packet AND information on this page.

Narrative...

Over the weekend one expansive low-pressure system with its fronts passed across the central U.S. Some thunderstorms produced severe weather in the southern Plains on Saturday while some heavy rains covered the southern states and snow amounts blanketed parts of northern states on Sunday. Details of this system are given in the Monday Daily Weather Summary for 30 January 2006.

The electronically delivered weather maps used in this course typically have greater detail than those seen on television or in newspapers. Image 1, "Isobars, Fronts, Radar, & Data", is the Sunday morning, 12Z 29 JAN 2006 (7 AM EST, 6 AM CST, 5 AM MST, 4 AM PST, etc.) surface weather map with plotted station models as well as locations of centers of high and low pressure from a computer analyzed pressure pattern, fronts, and radar reports of precipitation. An extensive explanation of map symbols used on the surface maps can be found from the "Users Guide" in the Extras section of the website.

The station models depict weather conditions across the country at that time. The center of the storm system, denoted by the lowest pressure, is marked by an "L" shown in along the Wisconsin-Illinois border.

Questions, always more questions....
4) The winds in the several state area around the Low center were generally [(clockwise) (counterclockwise)].

5) The pattern of winds around the Low center were also generally directed [(inward) (outward)] relative to the center, consistent with the hand-twist pattern of a Low presented in Investigation 1A.

A center of high pressure was located in the Atlantic Ocean to the east of the Carolinas, off the map area.
6) The wind directions at stations in an arc from Florida to North Carolina showed the wind flow around the western side of the High to be generally [(clockwise) (counterclockwise)] relative to the system's high-pressure center.

7) This pattern of winds about the High [(is) (is not)] consistent with the hand-twist model of a High pressure system.

8) The heavy lines with triangles (blue on-screen) from the Low to Louisiana marked the position of a [(cold) (warm) (stationary)] front. This front was the leading edge of a cooler air mass.

9) The triangle symbols along the front show that the cooler air was moving generally toward the [(southeast and east) (northwest and west)].

10) The heavy line with half-circles (red on-screen) from the Low eastward to Lake Erie marked the position of a [(cold) (warm) (stationary)] front. Another such front is shown in west-central Canada extending from another developing low-pressure system.

11) The heavy line with half-circles (red) and triangle (blue) symbols on opposite sides of the line that weaves its way from the Canadian Low northwestward to the map boundary marked the position of a [(cold) (warm) (stationary)] front indicating little or no movement of those portions of the front. Additional dashed orange lines in Texas and the northern Plains states proceeding from the Ls are "troughs" or extensions of lower pressure.

12) Observe the station model for Little Rock, in central Arkansas, on the Image 1 map. The station model showed a temperature of [(63) (50)] degrees F, and a dewpoint of 47 degrees F.

13) The winds were generally from the [(northwest) (southwest)] at about 10 knots.

14) The coded pressure value was plotted as "111", meaning the actual air pressure corrected to sea level was [(111.0) (1111.0) (1011.1)] mb.

15) The sky cover was shown as [(clear) (partly cloudy) (overcast)].

16) The weather symbol for current conditions at a station, two short, horizontal lines, (in the 9 o'clock position of the station model) as shown at Los Angeles and San Diego, California and also at Fargo, ND, Huron, SD and Des Moines, IA, indicated those stations were experiencing [(rain) (snow) (fog)]. [For a complete listing of the weather symbols, see the User's Guide linked from the website.]

17) The temperature at Los Angeles was 49 degrees and the dewpoint was _____ °F. The equal temperature and dewpoint values mean the air at Los Angeles was saturated with water vapor (100% relative humidity) producing this weather condition. The air at the other stations noted above with this condition were very close to equality indicating such approximate saturation.

18) The weather symbol for the current conditions at Atlanta, Georgia (dots, three in a triangle) signified _______________________

19) The weather symbol for the current conditions at Minneapolis, Minnesota, Canada (two stars) was _______________________

20) The 12Z map has shaded areas indicating where National Weather Service radar sites have detected precipitation or other radar signal returns. Radar can survey the sky for a more complete picture than may be sensed at the stations alone. On surface maps, the intensity of the radar echoes, which is related to the intensity of the precipitation, is shown by shadings using the scale near the left border of the map.
The shaded areas show precipitation probably was occurring: (in a broad arc over the eastern U.S. from Lake Superior to the Gulf of Mexico)
(large areas along the Northwest U.S. coast)
(widely scattered over the western states and the East Coast)
(in all these locations)].


21) The on-screen lightest purple shadings are often "false" radar echoes produced by early morning atmospheric conditions, common on 12Z maps such as this, and not really detected precipitation. Also, patches of few dots may signify light precipitation that evaporates before reaching the ground.

Displaying a sequence of recent surface weather maps ending with the current map in your classroom can show the movement of "weather makers" (high and low pressure centers and fronts) and the changes in atmospheric conditions at your location over time resulting from their movements. Practice looking for connections between weather changes depicted on the map sequence and predict local weather for the next half day or so.


22) Click on "Supplemental Information" for Tuesday, and read through that material.

23)

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1/25/2006

This is the same as for Monday, using today's data - with a twist. You'll see.

1) Go to the Datastreme web site using the link below - (right button click and open new page) then follow the directions listed below on this page.

Project Datastreme


2) On the tool bar, click "surface", then click "temperatures". Print the temperatures page (IN LANDSCAPE).

3) Draw isotherms on the map every 10 degrees (10, 20, 30, etc.) Use the same principle as that which you used for isobars. Connect ONLY temperatures of the same value. This is to be turned in TOMORROW.

See the following hints:

HELPFUL HINTS ON DRAWING ISOTHERMS: A) Always draw an isotherm so that temperature readings greater than the isotherm's value are consistantly on one side of the isotherm and lower values are on the other side.

B) When positioning isotherms, assume a steady temperature change between neighboring stations. For example, a 20 degree isobar would be drawn between 15 degrees and 25 degrees about halfway between the two.

C) Adjacent isotherms tend to look alike. The isotherms you are drawing will generally parallel the curves of their neighbors because horizontal changes in air temperature from place to place are usually gradual.

D) Continue drawing an isotherm until it reaches the boundary of the plotted data OR "closes" to form a loop by making its way to the starting point.

E) Isotherms NEVER stop or end within a data field, and they NEVER fork, touch, or cross one another.

F) Isotherms CANNOT be skipped if their values fall within the range of air temperatures reported on the map. Isotherms MUST always appear in sequence: for example, there must always be a 10 degree isotherm between the 7 degree and 14 degree isotherms.

G) ALWAYS label ALL isotherms!

4) Click on "Surface", then "U.S. Data" which is 1800Z 25JAN2006.
Print out the map (IN LANDSCAPE)

What is the weather in Indianapolis? (Check the weather map symbols)

5) What is the Wind direction in Indianapolis?

6) What is the wind speed in Indianapolis?

7) What is the cloud cover in Indianapolis?

8) Using the U.S. Data map, draw lines which encircle stations with at least 3/4 cloud cover. Group clusters of stations with 3/4 or more cloud cover together - in other words, include more than one station at a time inside your circles.
This is to be turned in with the isotherm map.

9) What is the fastest wind speed found on this map?

10) Where is the fastest wind speed (which you listed for #9) located?

11) Read the "Weather for the start of the new week" on the "Daily Summary" for Tuesday and Wednesday. This is a weather analysis based on current conditions over the weekend.

12) Go back and click on "surface", then on "Isotherms & Temperatures", and print it out (LANDSCAPE). Compare your isotherm drawing to ththe printout. Identify differences by circling the areas using ink. Turn them in on Friday.



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1/23/2006
1) Go to the Datastreme web site using the link below - (right button click and open new page) then follow the directions listed below on this page.

Project Datastreme


2) On the tool bar, click "surface", then click "temperatures". Print the temperatures page (IN LANDSCAPE).

3) Draw isotherms on the map every 10 degrees (10, 20, 30, etc.) Use the same principle as that which you used for isobars. Connect ONLY temperatures of the same value. This is to be turned in TOMORROW.

See the following hints:

HELPFUL HINTS ON DRAWING ISOTHERMS: A) Always draw an isotherm so that temperature readings greater than the isotherm's value are consistantly on one side of the isotherm and lower values are on the other side.

B) When positioning isotherms, assume a steady temperature change between neighboring stations. For example, a 20 degree isobar would be drawn between 15 degrees and 25 degrees about halfway between the two.

C) Adjacent isotherms tend to look alike. The isotherms you are drawing will generally parallel the curves of their neighbors because horizontal changes in air temperature from place to place are usually gradual.

D) Continue drawing an isotherm until it reaches the boundary of the plotted data OR "closes" to form a loop by making its way to the starting point.

E) Isotherms NEVER stop or end within a data field, and they NEVER fork, touch, or cross one another.

F) Isotherms CANNOT be skipped if their values fall within the range of air temperatures reported on the map. Isotherms MUST always appear in sequence: for example, there must always be a 10 degree isotherm between the 7 degree and 14 degree isotherms.

G) ALWAYS label ALL isotherms!

4) Click on "Surface", then "U.S. Data" which is 1700Z 23JAN2006.
Print out the map (IN LANDSCAPE)

What is the weather in Indianapolis? (Check the weather map symbols)

5) What is the Wind direction in Indianapolis?

6) What is the wind speed in Indianapolis?

7) What is the cloud cover in Indianapolis?

8) Using the U.S. Data map, draw lines which encircle stations with at least 3/4 cloud cover. Group clusters of stations with 3/4 or more cloud cover together - in other words, include more than one station at a time inside your circles.
This is to be turned in with the isotherm map.

9) What is the fastest wind speed found on this map?

10) Where is the fastest wind speed (which you listed for #9) located?

11) Read the "Weather for the start of the new week" on the "Daily Summary" for Monday. This is a weather analysis based on current conditions over the weekend.



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1/19/2006
1) Make sure you complete the last 2 days materials.

2) Answer the questions listed under"CONCEPT FOR THE DAY - AIR MASSES" found in the Daily summary for Thursday.

3) Place all the papers with answers to the activities together, staple them (including maps) IN ORDER and turn them in TODAY.

4)If you finish early, check out the Watches, Warnings, Advisories and Forecasts link. What advisories are in Indiana for today?

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1/18/2006

Yesterday's lab is below today's. Just scroll down and look for yesterday's date. Complete it, then come back to today's lab.

Open the
Project Datastreme
web page into a second page by placing the cursor over the link, right button click, then "open in new window".

Finish the exercise from Tuesday. Keep your papers until I return.

Begin the following investigation AFTER completing yesterday's assignment.

DataStreme Atmosphere Investigation 1B:
SURFACE AIR PRESSURE PATTERNS
Do Now:

Print (LANDSCAPE) the Wednesday Image 1 and Image 2 Files.

To Do Investigation:
Read Chapter 1 in the DataStreme Atmosphere textbook.

Investigation 1A (yesterday) dealt with the hand-twist model for relating wind directions to centers of high or low air pressure. This investigation demonstrates how those air pressure patterns can be determined and the high and low pressure centers found.

1) The Image 1 map acquired from the DataStreme Atmosphere website (identified across the top as "Pressures") displays atmospheric pressure values in whole millibars at the time of ______ Z on __________________ (date).

2) The lowest reported air pressure on the map at Saint Johns, New Brunswick, in eastern Canada, is [(977) (988) (995)] mb.

3) The highest reported pressure is _____ mb at Arcata in northern California.

4) The isobars in the conventional series that will be needed to complete the pressure analysis between those values on this map are: 992, _____, 1000, _____, _____, _____,_____, _____, _____, and _____. More than one isobar of the same value may need to be drawn if pressure values located in separate sections of the map area require it.

5 - instructions and hints) You might want to read the "helpful hints" below before drawing the isobars.
Using a pencil, follow the steps below to draw the indicated isobars on this map (every 4th mb following the established pattern of the lines drawn as an example) to determine the pressure pattern that existed at the time the observations were made. Consider each pressure value to be located at the center of the reported number. EXAMPLES: The 1016-mb isobars in the eastern U.S. and the 1020-mb isobar in eastern Canada have already been drawn.

Complete the analysis of pressures on the map by drawing the 1012-mb isobar to the west of the 1016-mb isobar. 1012 mb enters the map data region between "1007" and "1016" in central Canada and across Lake Superior. It passes through the center of the number in lower Michigan, between numbers heading southward to finally pass through the 1012s along the south Texas Gulf coast. Label the isobar value by printing 1012 at both ends of the isobar line you drew. Note, this isobar generally follows the curve of its neighbor, 1016.

This is essentially the same method used to draw other lines that connect data points of the same value, such as contour lines on topographic maps.

HELPFUL HINTS ON DRAWING ISOBARS: A) Always draw an isobar so that pressure readings greater than the isobar's value are consistantly on one side of the isobar and lower values are on the other side.


B) When positioning isobars, assume a steady pressure change between neighboring stations. For example, a 1012-mb isobar would be drawn between 1013 and 1010 about 1/3 the way from 1013.

C) Adjacent isobars tend to look alike. The isobar you are drawing will generally parallel the curves of its neighbors because horizontal changes in air pressure from place to place are usually gradual.

D) Continue drawing an isobar until it reaches the boundary of the plotted data OR "closes" to form a loop by making its way to the starting point.

E) Isobars NEVER stop or end within a data field, and they NEVER fork, touch, or cross one another.

F) Isobars CANNOT be skipped if their values fall within the range of air pressures reported on the map. Isobars MUST always appear in sequence: for example, there must always be a 1000-mb isobar between the 996-mb and 1004-mb isobars.

G) ALWAYS label ALL isobars!

Moving westward from the 1012-mb isobar towards lower pressures, next draw the 1008-mb isobar. Arbitrarily starting in Canada near the 1012-mb isobar, the 1008-mb isobar curves southeastward and around to central Texas before heading back northward along the AZ-NM border, finally ending at the data edge back in central Canada. Label the isobar at the ends with its value, 1008. (While all isobars eventually "close" or meet, it is customary to end the line at the edge of the plotted values. Connecting the nearby ends of the 1008-mb isobar could be done and labelled in a break of the line, see below.)

(5 continued) Complete the pattern of lower-valued isobars in the central U.S. These isobars, 1004 and 1000, will circle around to meet within the data field. Label each isobar line with its value at a break along the line rather than at the end. (Although an isobar value, 996 represents a single point, so no line needs to be drawn as separation of values below that.)

6) Place a bold L in South Dakota where the lowest pressure value is plotted.

Complete the pressure analysis over the western quarter of the map for the appropriate isobar values listed in question number 13 above. Beginning with 1012, the isobars increase westward again in value. Also, complete the isobars across the northeastern U.S. and Canada, to the east of the eastern 1016-mb isobar where the pressure values decrease from 1012 to 992 mb. (Again, 988 represents only a single point, hence needing no line.) Be sure to label each isobar with its value.

7) Image 2 is the "Isobars, Fronts, Radar & Data" map for 00Z 16 JAN 2006. This Image 2 map [(is) (is not)] the same time and date as the map of pressures you have just analyzed.

8) The time/date of the Image 2 map [(is) (is not)] the same time as the U.S. Data map of national weather conditions you used for the hand-twist patterns in Monday's Investigation 1A.

9) Compare your hand-drawn pressure analysis on the Image 1 map with the analysis made by computer on the Image 2 map. Some of the differences between your analysis and that shown are because the computer analysis is based on data from a larger number of stations. Note the position of the L in east-central South Dakota and the H in western Oregon on the Image 2 Isobars, Fronts, Radar & Data map. These positions [(are) (are not)] the approximate locations of the L and H you positioned in the Monday Investigation 1A map used for the hand twists.

10) These L and H positions [(are) (are not)] also the approximate locations of locally lowest and highest plotted air pressure values you showed with your isobar analysis of the Image 1 Pressures map.

The map you have just analyzed represents atmospheric conditions across the country at the time of those observations. Meteorologists (or their computer systems) analyze pressure patterns as you have to locate centers of storminess and fair weather.

In the Week 2 Investigations we will look at the more complete set of weather conditions reported in the station models.


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1/17/2006
Ok, my instructions on this page take precedence over the instructions on the Datastreme web page. In other words, no matter what the Datastreme web site says to do, do what I say to do....

1) Open the
Project Datastreme
web page into a second page by placing the cursor over the link, right button click, then "open in new window".

2) Under "DataStreme Atmosphere Investigations" Click on "Monday - Investigation A". Read through the instructions, but the only printout you will need to do is "Monday Image 1 File". Print it out IN LANDSCAPE. The others will be provided in class.

3) Answer the questions about "chapter 1" (the packet) on the answer sheet provided - circling your answer is good enough, where applicable.

4) In the "Daily Summary" section, click on Tuesday - there are 2 questions you will need to answer - place them on the back of the question sheet I provide in class.

5) Click on "Supplemental Information" for Tuesday, and read through that material.

6) Return to the "DataStreme Atmosphere Investigations" and "Monday - Investigation A".
Scroll below the instructions and answer the questions, starting with number 14.

Keep your papers until I ask for them!




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1/12/2006

Go to the
Project Datastreme
website and answer the questions below. You will need to draw symbols which are colored; if you happen to have colored pencils, that's great - but if not, just write the color next to the symbol.

1) Warm Front
2) Cold Front
3) Stationary Front
4) Occluded Front
Draw a surface station model with the following data:
5) Wind at 15 knots from the Southeast
6) temperature 61
7) pressure 1019mb
8) 25% sky cover
9) Dew point 55
10) Fog

Draw the symbols for each of the following:
11) Dryline
12) Squall line

Your quiz tomorrow WILL INCLUDE knowing the symbols listed above, and knowing what data is found in each position on the station model, as well as anything in Chpater 1.

Go to the main Datastreme web site again.
Project Datastreme

Click on "Daily Summary" for Monday.

13) What happened in Terre Haute in 1987 according to this web site?

Go back, then click on Tuesday.

14) What happened in 1949 on Jan 10 in San Diego, CA?

Go back, and click on Thursday.

15) What was the temerature in Rapid City on this date in 1987?

When you finish, keep your papers to turn in tomorrow. Please also make note of Appendix "B" and appendix "F" in your textbook, which may be of some help.

If you have not already finished the questions which were passed out yesterday, please work on them afer you complete this exercise.


***********************************
1/9/2006

Read the following, and follow the instructions below.

I would like you to start keeping a daily log of the weather when you get to school - temperature, pressure, etc. I would also like for you to keep track of cloud cover: overcast, 50% covered, etc. We will be going over identification of cloud types, which will be useful later. The idea is to build a data set which you can analyze later to see if you can see any patterns.

I'll give you the morning data in a format you can chart; you'll likely get the afternoon data from either the weather radio or TWC.


On occasion I will have you read articles about weather or climate, and expect you to synthesize the article - summarize it, etc.

Expect also, to jump off topic from time to time, especially if there is a significant weather related event.

Answer the questions below each link provided, or links from the sites.

>>You should turn this in today.<<

On each of the following web sites, summarize the article and identify why it is relevant to meteorology or how it is affected by meteorology, and how it might affect you and/or the economy.


EPA to improve reporting of air emissions



Stronger standards for particles proposed



Air pollution and heart disease



Treated wood poses long term threat


When you finish with your summaries, please go back to the following web sites and explore the different data types available on the web site, particularly the Station Model and what information can be found in what position on the station model. Look on the weather map symbols page on the Project Datastreme web site for an explanation of this.

BONUS: Explain "Z" time (Like 1600Z) that is found on the different data maps.


Project Datastreme!



NCAR!



***********************************
1/5/2006
1) What information can be found on this site (and links from it)?

NCAR!



Follow instructions and answer questions using the site below. This will set you up for the rest of the labs, so pay attention to what you are doing!


Project Datastreme!


2) What is the symbol used for a thunderstorm? (look in weather map symbols)

3) Click on "Surface", then "Isotherms and Temperatures". Print out the page.

4) Using the print out, what are isotherms?

5) At what interval are isotherms printed on the print out?

6) Click on "Isobars and Pressures". Print out the page.

7) Using the print out, what are isobars?

8) At what interval are the isobars printed on trhe print out?

Click on "Isobars, Fronts, Radar, and Data".

9) Print out the page. Compare the printout to the screen. What might become a problem if you were using only the printout to see the information?

10) Click on "Upper Air" then "500 mB data". What is the wind speed and the direction in Cincinnati, Ohio? (Use the map symbols link to find out)

11) Click on "Current NWS Weather Watches and Warnings". What are the current watches or warnings for Indiana?

12) Compare the latest Infrared data to the latest water vapor data. How well do they match? (Exact, very close, not very well, or not at all)

Fini!

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Lowell Bailey

Bedford-North Lawrence High School
595 N. Stars Boulevard
Bedford
IN
47421
USA
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